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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was told by a Honda dealership that I shouldn’t get rims from the internet for my car because it could mess my car up so they said it would be best to just by actually Honda rims specifically for my car how true is that?
 

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I was told by a Honda dealership that I shouldn’t get rims from the internet for my car because it could mess my car up so they said it would be best to just by actually Honda rims specifically for my car how true is that?
Did they provide any detail as why aftermarket rims "could mess the car up"? Sounds like a sales tactic to me. :unsure:

Only thing that I can think of that quite possibly be an issue is the TPMS on our car. Since our TPMS doesn't directly monitor the air pressure in the tires...

Instead of directly measuring the pressure in each tire, the TPMS on this vehicle monitors and compares the rolling radius and rotational characteristics of each wheel and tire while you are driving to determine if one or more tires are significantly under-inflated. This will cause the low tire pressure/TPMS indicator to come on and a message to appear on the driver information interface.

If for some reason the aftermarket wheels were outside of the parameters (if there are any) of what this system could calibrate too then it might cause it to throw a warning.
 

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If what they actually told you is as vague as “it could mess your car up” then I’ll call BS. Could you put ridiculous wheels on your car and cause damage due to rubbing, bottoming out, etc.? Sure. However if you were to buy wheels with roughly the same overall characteristics as your stock wheels (same outer diameter with the tires, similar offset, etc.) then you aren’t going to “mess up” anything.

There’s a thriving aftermarket industry for wheels for a reason, and if no one was able to buy anything but OEM wheels for fear of damaging their car it wouldn’t exist. Depending on what you’re buying OEM wheels costs a ton more than aftermarket wheels as well. On my old Mazda 3 a single OEM wheel was close to $500.

As to the TPMS.... yes the TPMS judges the pressure based on the rotation of the wheel and comparing against the other wheels using the ABS sensor. If you change your wheels out just run the calibration in infotainment settings menu, drive a little bit, and it will then be set to your new wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So if I were to buy rims for my accord what should I focus on like to make sure nothing throws my car for they said basically it’s because the inside part would make my car start bouncing and over wierd stuff
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Did they provide any detail as why aftermarket rims "could mess the car up"? Sounds like a sales tactic to me. :unsure:

Only thing that I can think of that quite possibly be an issue is the TPMS on our car. Since our TPMS doesn't directly monitor the air pressure in the tires...

Instead of directly measuring the pressure in each tire, the TPMS on this vehicle monitors and compares the rolling radius and rotational characteristics of each wheel and tire while you are driving to determine if one or more tires are significantly under-inflated. This will cause the low tire pressure/TPMS indicator to come on and a message to appear on the driver information interface.

If for some reason the aftermarket wheels were outside of the parameters (if there are any) of what this system could calibrate too then it might cause it to throw a warning.
They had basically told me that my car would be doing wierd stuff if I didn’t buy rims that are good for my car but I think all I’d have to look for was like the wheel size right? I’ve never bought rims for anything so I don’t know what I’m doing.
 

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They had basically told me that my car would be doing wierd stuff if I didn’t buy rims that are good for my car but I think all I’d have to look for was like the wheel size right? I’ve never bought rims for anything so I don’t know what I’m doing.
If I were looking for new rims/tires I would start at the following places: Tire Rack & Fitment Industries. Put in the year/make/model of your car and they will give you wheel/tire combo's that will work on your car.
 

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There are a couple of dimensions which are important when looking at wheels. There’s:
-diameter
-wheel width
-bolt pattern (number and spacing of lug holes)
-offset (where the wheel meets the hub in relation to the center line of the tire)

many different size wheels will fit a given car, though some may push the limits of the space you have. In general you can change the diameter of the wheel and then compensate for the larger or smaller wheel with a different size tire. Your speedometer is calibrated for the overall diameter of your stock wheels/tires, so going with something larger or smaller can make the speedometer be off +/-. In general you want to stay within 3% of the size of the stock diameter to avoid speedometer issues.

If you throw the offset off too far one direction or the other you may rub your tires when you turn the wheel to the stops because the tire will be sitting in a different position as compared to the hub (farther in or out).

if you make the wheels really big and they’re larger than the original diameter you may bottom them out in the wheel well when the suspension compresses. Also of increased potential issues if you lower the car. Again staying with the same overall diameter avoids this issue.

Different wheels and tires will lend different characteristics. A large wheel with a low profile tire won’t deal with bumps as well, and if you live somewhere with crappy roads you may bend your wheels. Also those tires cost more. Also larger wheels are heavier (more metal) so you’re increasing rotating mass which affects mileage. Super small wheels may not fit over your brakes. I think the smallest you can go on the LX is a 16” wheel. If it’s a hybrid then 17” is the smallest.

What are you interested in putting on your car?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There are a couple of dimensions which are important when looking at wheels. There’s:
-diameter
-wheel width
-bolt pattern (number and spacing of lug holes)
-offset (where the wheel meets the hub in relation to the center line of the tire)

many different size wheels will fit a given car, though some may push the limits of the space you have. In general you can change the diameter of the wheel and then compensate for the larger or smaller wheel with a different size tire. Your speedometer is calibrated for the overall diameter of your stock wheels/tires, so going with something larger or smaller can make the speedometer be off +/-. In general you want to stay within 3% of the size of the stock diameter to avoid speedometer issues.

If you throw the offset off too far one direction or the other you may rub your tires when you turn the wheel to the stops because the tire will be sitting in a different position as compared to the hub (farther in or out).

if you make the wheels really big and they’re larger than the original diameter you may bottom them out in the wheel well when the suspension compresses. Also of increased potential issues if you lower the car. Again staying with the same overall diameter avoids this issue.

Different wheels and tires will lend different characteristics. A large wheel with a low profile tire won’t deal with bumps as well, and if you live somewhere with crappy roads you may bend your wheels. Also those tires cost more. Also larger wheels are heavier (more metal) so you’re increasing rotating mass which affects mileage. Super small wheels may not fit over your brakes. I think the smallest you can go on the LX is a 16” wheel. If it’s a hybrid then 17” is the smallest.

What are you interested in putting on your car?
I basically just wanna get 19 inch rims for it but I wanna make sure I have all the correct measurements for it so I don’t mess it up so like how much over the offset can I go?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
There are a couple of dimensions which are important when looking at wheels. There’s:
-diameter
-wheel width
-bolt pattern (number and spacing of lug holes)
-offset (where the wheel meets the hub in relation to the center line of the tire)

many different size wheels will fit a given car, though some may push the limits of the space you have. In general you can change the diameter of the wheel and then compensate for the larger or smaller wheel with a different size tire. Your speedometer is calibrated for the overall diameter of your stock wheels/tires, so going with something larger or smaller can make the speedometer be off +/-. In general you want to stay within 3% of the size of the stock diameter to avoid speedometer issues.

If you throw the offset off too far one direction or the other you may rub your tires when you turn the wheel to the stops because the tire will be sitting in a different position as compared to the hub (farther in or out).

if you make the wheels really big and they’re larger than the original diameter you may bottom them out in the wheel well when the suspension compresses. Also of increased potential issues if you lower the car. Again staying with the same overall diameter avoids this issue.

Different wheels and tires will lend different characteristics. A large wheel with a low profile tire won’t deal with bumps as well, and if you live somewhere with crappy roads you may bend your wheels. Also those tires cost more. Also larger wheels are heavier (more metal) so you’re increasing rotating mass which affects mileage. Super small wheels may not fit over your brakes. I think the smallest you can go on the LX is a 16” wheel. If it’s a hybrid then 17” is the smallest.

What are you interested in putting on your car?
would be be good enough?
4659
 

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I basically just wanna get 19 inch rims for it but I wanna make sure I have all the correct measurements for it so I don’t mess it up so like how much over the offset can I go?
a small change probably won’t make much of a difference. If the tire moves too far out then it can hit the inside of the fender when the suspension compresses. Likewise too far in and you can rub the fender liner when you turn to the stops.note the picture you posted is for a 17” wheel.

as far as I know the stock 17” wheels have a 45mm offset. The stock 19” have a 50mm. That means these wheels’ mounting surface is 5mm closer to the centerline of the wheel. Probably unlikely to cause issues with that little of a change, but YMMV. Pretty sure the stock 19” are also 8.5” wide.

you’d want to check a tire size calculator for the correct tire size to keep the diameter the same. Tire rack, etc will recommend tire sizes for you, and you can google tire size comparisons to manually compare if you like. Pretty sure the stock 19” tires are 235/40 19
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
a small change probably won’t make much of a difference. If the tire moves too far out then it can hit the inside of the fender when the suspension compresses. Likewise too far in and you can rub the fender liner when you turn to the stops.note the picture you posted is for a 17” wheel.

as far as I know the stock 17” wheels have a 45mm offset. The stock 19” have a 50mm. That means these wheels’ mounting surface is 5mm closer to the centerline of the wheel. Probably unlikely to cause issues with that little of a change, but YMMV. Pretty sure the stock 19” are also 8.5” wide.

you’d want to check a tire size calculator for the correct tire size to keep the diameter the same. Tire rack, etc will recommend tire sizes for you, and you can google tire size comparisons to manually compare if you like. Pretty sure the stock 19” tires are 235/40 19
If I stayed with 17 inch rims though would those rims work for my car?
 

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If I stayed with 17 inch rims though would those rims work for my car?
those look to be the same dimensions and offset as the stock 17”, so I imagine they’d have no problem. Also look into tire costs before you make your choice. Smaller wheels with higher profile tires can save you a lot of money over the life of the car.

Depending on the center bore size they may need hub centric rings, but most wheel sellers will include them for free, or for a few dollars if they’re required. Center bore refers to the diameter of the raised circle on the hub around the axle nut. Hub centric wheels sit on that lip to hold the wheel centered for the lugs. If the center bore of the wheel is larger than that lip a hub needs a spacer/hub centric ring to take up the space.

Pretty sure the accord can be hub centric or lug centric for centering though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There are a couple of dimensions which are important when looking at wheels. There’s:
-diameter
-wheel width
-bolt pattern (number and spacing of lug holes)
-offset (where the wheel meets the hub in relation to the center line of the tire)

many different size wheels will fit a given car, though some may push the limits of the space you have. In general you can change the diameter of the wheel and then compensate for the larger or smaller wheel with a different size tire. Your speedometer is calibrated for the overall diameter of your stock wheels/tires, so going with something larger or smaller can make the speedometer be off +/-. In general you want to stay within 3% of the size of the stock diameter to avoid speedometer issues.

If you throw the offset off too far one direction or the other you may rub your tires when you turn the wheel to the stops because the tire will be sitting in a different position as compared to the hub (farther in or out).

if you make the wheels really big and they’re larger than the original diameter you may bottom them out in the wheel well when the suspension compresses. Also of increased potential issues if you lower the car. Again staying with the same overall diameter avoids this issue.

Different wheels and tires will lend different characteristics. A large wheel with a low profile tire won’t deal with bumps as well, and if you live somewhere with crappy roads you may bend your wheels. Also those tires cost more. Also larger wheels are heavier (more metal) so you’re increasing rotating mass which affects mileage. Super small wheels may not fit over your brakes. I think the smallest you can go on the LX is a 16” wheel. If it’s a hybrid then 17” is the smallest.

What are you interested in putting on your car?
those look to be the same dimensions and offset as the stock 17”, so I imagine they’d have no problem. Also look into tire costs before you make your choice. Smaller wheels with higher profile tires can save you a lot of money over the life of the car.

Depending on the center bore size they may need hub centric rings, but most wheel sellers will include them for free, or for a few dollars if they’re required. Center bore refers to the diameter of the raised circle on the hub around the axle nut. Hub centric wheels sit on that lip to hold the wheel centered for the lugs. If the center bore of the wheel is larger than that lip a hub needs a spacer/hub centric ring to take up the space.

Pretty sure the accord can be hub centric or lug centric for centering though.
High profile tires are like high performance tires right? I’m looking on tire rack and I’m not understanding how to tell if they are high or low profile tires
 

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High profile tires are like high performance tires right? I’m looking on tire rack and I’m not understanding how to tell if they are high or low profile tires
It refers to how much tire sidewall there is. A low profile tire has a very small sidewall. The numbers for a tire size are the tread width, the sidewall (expressed as a percentage of the tread width), and the wheel outer diameter/tire inner diameter.

There are trade offs with larger and smaller sidewalls. Really low profile sidewalls offer less flex when cornering and would feel less mushy than a high profile tire (again it would depend on the tires because some high profile tires can have really stiff sidewalls). That’s where speed and performance ratings become more important than the size/dimensions of the tire. You’d get a much firmer turning experience by going with improved suspension components than with low profile tires. Low profile tires also absorb less shock from the road, and may give you a harsher ride. More of the force is being absorbed by the rigid wheel vs the flexible tire. If you live in a place with really bad roads then there’s a bigger chance you could damage a large wheel with low profile tires by hitting huge potholes. I bent two winter wheels two winters ago on my other two cars from hitting huge potholes. Both were steel wheels, and one was mild enough it could just be bent back into shape. The other was bad enough I had to replace the wheel. Tires for larger wheels tend to cost more. That’s where I suggested you compare the costs of the tires you’d need to be buying with whatever wheels you end up buying. If you want 19’s then find the ones you like, mount them up and enjoy. Just make sure you compare the prices and characteristics of those wheels vs. 18/17” wheels, and the tires that would go with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It refers to how much tire sidewall there is. A low profile tire has a very small sidewall. The numbers for a tire size are the tread width, the sidewall (expressed as a percentage of the tread width), and the wheel outer diameter/tire inner diameter.

There are trade offs with larger and smaller sidewalls. Really low profile sidewalls offer less flex when cornering and would feel less mushy than a high profile tire (again it would depend on the tires because some high profile tires can have really stiff sidewalls). That’s where speed and performance ratings become more important than the size/dimensions of the tire. You’d get a much firmer turning experience by going with improved suspension components than with low profile tires. Low profile tires also absorb less shock from the road, and may give you a harsher ride. More of the force is being absorbed by the rigid wheel vs the flexible tire. If you live in a place with really bad roads then there’s a bigger chance you could damage a large wheel with low profile tires by hitting huge potholes. I bent two winter wheels two winters ago on my other two cars from hitting huge potholes. Both were steel wheels, and one was mild enough it could just be bent back into shape. The other was bad enough I had to replace the wheel. Tires for larger wheels tend to cost more. That’s where I suggested you compare the costs of the tires you’d need to be buying with whatever wheels you end up buying. If you want 19’s then find the ones you like, mount them up and enjoy. Just make sure you compare the prices and characteristics of those wheels vs. 18/17” wheels, and the tires that would go with them.
Okay thank you so much sir you’ve been very helpful thanks for everything
 
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