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Purchased a new Accord touring 2.0t 2 days ago. commuted to work and drove it to get windows tinted. Total of 174 miles. Got into the car to find warning message stating "adaptive dampersytem problem see your dealer". Not good. We all buy hondas for reliability. anyone have any suggestions?
 

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Have you noticed any changes in the suspension since this message came on? It could just a software fault if the car is having problems making required adjustments.
 

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Purchased a new Accord touring 2.0t 2 days ago. commuted to work and drove it to get windows tinted. Total of 174 miles. Got into the car to find warning message stating "adaptive dampersytem problem see your dealer". Not good. We all buy hondas for reliability. anyone have any suggestions?
I would take it to the dealer as it suggests. It stinks but unfortunately Honda has a lot of bugs to iron out with the new Accord. A lot of issues are being reported here in many different areas. Honda is not what it used to be. Too many electronics, sensors and computer programming in today's cars do not make them as reliable as before when they had less of all this stuff. Honda unfortunately is no exception. My 4 Civics ('93/97/'01/06) and wife's 2004 CRV never saw the inside of the dealer's shop after I bought them. Not a single problem except for 1 alternator until they got sold with 175k-180k on the odo (wife's CRV was totalled at 110k mi. but not 1 problem). Not so with my wife's 2013 Accord - she 's been back to the dealer 7-8 times for O2, transmission sensors, torque sensor, TPMS sensor, rattles, etc. and the car has 55k mi. on it. Now the shocks are blown and drives like a MACK truck. I too will be making a visit to the dealer for my '19 Accord (with 400 mi.) very soon for several things. Unfortunately it's not just Honda. Most brands are like this, and my Bimmer is 2x-3x worse (and a lot more expensive to maintain) Today you can't even change the battery on most cars without going to the dealer to have it registered with the ECU and that's the least of it. Any time anything needs to be "reset", because of software & programming issues and sensor hanging up, you have to go to the dealer. Makes car ownership a lot more stressful as compared to 10-15 years ago. :sad:

To make matters worse most of the time manufacturers do not correct these things or defects until the next production model release, unless it's a major safety issue, but they also introduce new technology and more bugs, so it's a vicious cycle.. My 2011 335i was the 5th and last year of that production model (e90/e92/e93) but I still have experienced most of the same issues as the 2007-2010 models. Honda and others are the same way. They are already working on the next production model and have no time, $ or resources to go back and redesign the systems or parts of the existing model line.
 
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I would take it to the dealer as it suggests. It stinks but unfortunately Honda has a lot of bugs to iron out with the new Accord. A lot of issues are being reported here in many different areas. Honda is not what it used to be. Too many electronics, sensors and computer programming in today's cars do not make them as reliable as before when they had less of all this stuff. Honda unfortunately is no exception. My 4 Civics ('93/97/'01/06) and wife's 2004 CRV never saw the inside of the dealer's shop after I bought them. Not a single problem except for 1 alternator until they got sold with 175k-180k on the odo (wife's CRV was totalled at 110k mi. but not 1 problem). Not so with my wife's 2013 Accord - she 's been back to the dealer 7-8 times for O2, transmission sensors, torque sensor, TPMS sensor, rattles, etc. and the car has 55k mi. on it. Now the shocks are blown and drives like a MACK truck. I too will be making a visit to the dealer for my '19 Accord (with 400 mi.) very soon for several things. Unfortunately it's not just Honda. Most brands are like this, and my Bimmer is 2x-3x worse (and a lot more expensive to maintain) Today you can't even change the battery on most cars without going to the dealer to have it registered with the ECU and that's the least of it. Any time anything needs to be "reset", because of software & programming issues and sensor hanging up, you have to go to the dealer. Makes car ownership a lot more stressful as compared to 10-15 years ago. :sad:

To make matters worse most of the time manufacturers do not correct these things or defects until the next production model release, unless it's a major safety issue, but they also introduce new technology and more bugs, so it's a vicious cycle.. My 2011 335i was the 5th and last year of that production model (e90/e92/e93) but I still have experienced most of the same issues as the 2007-2010 models. Honda and others are the same way. They are already working on the next production model and have no time, $ or resources to go back and redesign the systems or parts of the existing model line.
You hit the nail square on the head.... cars these days w/all the electronics/computer systems are prone to have issues (makes one wonder if all the "advancements" are worth it). Then you have the manufacturers rushing to get cars to production (w/o real world long term testing) and we the end users become the "beta testers"... even more so when there is a new generation introduced. As you mentioned this is not only a "Honda" issue but it can be found in other auto manufacturers (also found this w/motorcycle manufacturers). For my sanity and a time management issue I try not to run back to dealer for individual issues (as long as they are not safety related) until it's time for a service. This way I'm not wasting my time and just provide them a "laundry list" of issues at one time.
 

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I Agree with What You Guys are Saying

You hit the nail square on the head.... cars these days w/all the electronics/computer systems are prone to have issues (makes one wonder if all the "advancements" are worth it). Then you have the manufacturers rushing to get cars to production (w/o real world long term testing) and we the end users become the "beta testers"... even more so when there is a new generation introduced. As you mentioned this is not only a "Honda" issue but it can be found in other auto manufacturers (also found this w/motorcycle manufacturers). For my sanity and a time management issue I try not to run back to dealer for individual issues (as long as they are not safety related) until it's time for a service. This way I'm not wasting my time and just provide them a "laundry list" of issues at one time.
It really is Boiling down to Earlier Life Cycles , These Manufacture are trying to Break It In Our Pockets ( Money )

You all Need to Document it - In ( Writing ) have Attached to the Dealer's Service Tech - I'm going to have them Sign it so they Understand it's Business , I haven't been Invited over to Their Home to Meet
College Daughter , They didn't Supply Me with a List of Possible Customers , Honda Dealer didn't Get Me Approved for Home Loan , If You see where I'm coming From ..

It's Big Investment and It's Going to Real , Real Quick ! ( Not doing the 3-4 Trip - 4 Days Time We'll Bill Honda ) and 3 weeks Later Thing ~ Might Be Corrected - Bam ( In Writing ) Sign It !
 
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