2018 Honda Accord Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a question for you guys.
Is the hybrid worth getting for a guy that has a very heavy foot and does mostly 70mph highway driving?
Other option would be to just get the 2.0 Turbo.
Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I have a question for you guys.
Is the hybrid worth getting for a guy that has a very heavy foot and does mostly 70mph highway driving?
Other option would be to just get the 2.0 Turbo.
Thanks
Yes, it could be worth getting for a guy like you described. But maybe not for you specifically. You have to test-drive it yourself to find out, and even an extensive test drive might not be enough.

"Hybrid" does not mean "underpowered," even if "Prius" does. But the HAH isn't a 2.0T; it falls somewhere in between the 1.5T and the 2.0T. Where exactly is hard to say, since the characteristics are different. It will be closer to the 2.0T at lower speeds, closer to the 1.5T at higher speeds. But the driving experience (maximum torque up to 35 mph, and linear acceleration with no shifting ever) is completely different. I, personally, find that the linear acceleration removes my tendencies to have a heavy foot. You may be different.

But if those are your choices, note that the Hybrid costs $400 (EX-L) to $960 (Touring) less than the 2.0T. The bigger price break with the Touring is because there are other differences, like the 19" wheels (so the, Hybrid's ride is smoother). And the Hybrid will get better mileage, even if you can't make it get the 48 mpg rating. My biggest concern for you, is that 70+ mpg is about where you start to lose mpgs. The 2.0T will lose them as well, but maybe not as quickly.

But you can evaluate this mileage in a test drive. Since you won't be familiar with the controls, here are detailed instructions. You will be watching the "Driver Interface Display," or DID, which is what Honda calls the left half of the dashboard display:
  1. You have to start this evaluation after having driven the HAH for about 10 miles, so everything is warmed up.
  2. Choose a highway where you can drive at a sustained speed that is normal for you.
  3. You can do this while driving; if you stop, you will need to do a longer evaluation.
    1. On the left part of the steering wheel, press the "Home" button.
    2. Use the scroll wheel to find the "Range & Fuel" display. Press the wheel to select it.
    3. Use the scroll wheel to choose trip "A" or trip "B" for the test, as you choose.
    4. Press the wheel to reset the trip counter. You will need to confirm the reset.
  4. Drive normally. Don't worry about the paddles. It shouldn't take long for the mpg estimate in the DID to settle on your average highway mileage. And remember that actual mileage may be about 3% better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Jeff,
I guess what I'm wonding is if I will see a big enough fuel increase with the hybrid over the 2.0 Turbo. I drove both, and had more fun in the turbo. But we do a lot of driving as we're about 45 miles from a major town, family and most friends. I can't help but think I should be looking more for a hybrid but only if I can average 10 to 15 mpg more then the 2.0 Turbo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I guess what I'm wonding is if I will see a big enough fuel increase with the hybrid over the 2.0 Turbo.
I understand your heartburn, but I can't give you any guarantees. All I can say is that it is possible, and I have no firm idea (I do have suspicions) why some people don't. That's why I described that test. My suggestion is to pick the hybrid on the lot that you would buy, perform that test, and use the mileage you get in your decision.

+++++

We recently took a two-week, 2000 mile trip with very mixed driving. It included 55 mph highways, 75 mph highways, country roads, city roads, and the mountains of West Virginia and Tennessee. Temperatures were often around 95, so A/C was a must. There were two significant segments in a driving rainstorm, which is very bad for mileage; not only do you have to accelerate all that water from 0 to (whatever) mph, those times where you feel the puddles slowing you down are doing more than just that. You are pushing against them while slowing down.

The four tanks of gas that spanned the trip took 42.6 gallons.The distance for them was 2041 miles. That's 47.9 mpg. Without the rain and mountains, I would have expected over 50. At 26 mpg (if it could get that in those circumstances), the 2.0T AT would have needed 78.5 gallons.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top