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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The auto critics were overjoyed when Honda decided to keep to their heritage with a manual transmission in the 2018 Accord LX (Canada only) and also the 2018-2020 Accord Sport (both 1.5T and 2.0T). I have two of these, a 2018 (wife's) and a 2019 (mine). On the day I picked up my wife's car, I received a quick lesson on the logistics, procedures and technology. One of the strange procedures that I learned about was the steps to start the car. The new electronic E brake needs to be engaged in order to start the car. Up till now, the clutch pedal depressed was the requirement for the car to start. Again, this is for a manual transmission. In the name of safety, it was someone's idea to have this new requirement for the car to start. Safety eh? Here's the problem, x 2.
1. If you happen to be in an intersection and stall the car, the time required to put the E brake on and restart the car is now a couple of seconds longer. When your sitting in the middle of an intersection with traffic, seconds matter. Not safe at all.
2. Due to the fact that each time you park the car, the E brake is engaged at full (very high) pressure. This unusual amount of pressure causes the rotor to pit. As early as only 10,000 kilometers (6k miles) the rotors look as though they have 200k kilometers of use. What then happens is the brake pads now have grooves on the surface and this compounds the issue of the rotor wear. I do believe that brakes are also a safety item and with the reduced surface contact (the result of grooved pads and pitted rotors), this is a safety concern, without a doubt.
Fortunately for Honda, they discontinued the Accord models with manual transmissions starting in 2021. For the 3 model years that this was offered, Honda needs to find a solution or, out of goodwill, replace the rear rotors and pads to the original owner for a generous time of ownership. The solution is a simple one. Change the vehicle PLC so that the car can start with the clutch pedal depressed, just like we did for decades before.
 

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2018 Accord Sport 2.0T 6MT
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If only they would have just stuck with the good ol' hand brake lever...

I don't recall have to engage the parking brake after stalling in my 17 civic si or my 18 accord sport (both US spec) the couple of times I actually stalled them. Might have to do it the next time I drive just to check that out though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do recall, if you stall, you may have an allotted time to restart before needing to apply the E brake. I should double check this with my car(s) too. Anyone else have the premature rear rotor wear? I just had mine replaced under warranty at 28k kilometers (approx 17,500 miles). I'll be back before the warranty expires for another replacement, I guess.
 

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2018 Accord Sport 2.0T 6MT
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I do recall, if you stall, you may have an allotted time to restart before needing to apply the E brake. I should double check this with my car(s) too. Anyone else have the premature rear rotor wear? I just had mine replaced under warranty at 28k kilometers (approx 17,500 miles). I'll be back before the warranty expires for another replacement, I guess.
I had excessive wear on the rear rotors of my Si but having just gotten my Accord I don't know if the rotors have been replaced. They look ok at the moment.
 

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The auto critics were overjoyed when Honda decided to keep to their heritage with a manual transmission in the 2018 Accord LX (Canada only) and also the 2018-2020 Accord Sport (both 1.5T and 2.0T). I have two of these, a 2018 (wife's) and a 2019 (mine). On the day I picked up my wife's car, I received a quick lesson on the logistics, procedures and technology. One of the strange procedures that I learned about was the steps to start the car. The new electronic E brake needs to be engaged in order to start the car. Up till now, the clutch pedal depressed was the requirement for the car to start. Again, this is for a manual transmission. In the name of safety, it was someone's idea to have this new requirement for the car to start. Safety eh? Here's the problem, x 2.
1. If you happen to be in an intersection and stall the car, the time required to put the E brake on and restart the car is now a couple of seconds longer. When your sitting in the middle of an intersection with traffic, seconds matter. Not safe at all.
2. Due to the fact that each time you park the car, the E brake is engaged at full (very high) pressure. This unusual amount of pressure causes the rotor to pit. As early as only 10,000 kilometers (6k miles) the rotors look as though they have 200k kilometers of use. What then happens is the brake pads now have grooves on the surface and this compounds the issue of the rotor wear. I do believe that brakes are also a safety item and with the reduced surface contact (the result of grooved pads and pitted rotors), this is a safety concern, without a doubt.
Fortunately for Honda, they discontinued the Accord models with manual transmissions starting in 2021. For the 3 model years that this was offered, Honda needs to find a solution or, out of goodwill, replace the rear rotors and pads to the original owner for a generous time of ownership. The solution is a simple one. Change the vehicle PLC so that the car can start with the clutch pedal depressed, just like we did for decades before.
Step 1: Don't stall the car ;)

2nd thought, its sad Honda is discontinuing manuals, they're already too hard to find,
 

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I do recall, if you stall, you may have an allotted time to restart before needing to apply the E brake. I should double check this with my car(s) too. Anyone else have the premature rear rotor wear? I just had mine replaced under warranty at 28k kilometers (approx 17,500 miles). I'll be back before the warranty expires for another replacement, I guess.
It might not be the e-brake that's causing the wear. With my 2008 Accord, the rear brakes wore faster than the fronts. What I was told (and read on some forums) was that it might be because of the ABS / stability control system / Honda's VSA. I don't remember the specifics, but in general the car might use more rear brake to prevent nose dive for braking and the car uses the rear brakes more for stability control/slip control when cornering.
 

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'20 Sport 2.0T 6MT, Still Night Pearl. '07 EX-L I4/Nav sold.
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The rears on my '07 wore faster, too, but I think part of the reason is, if I recall correctly, there were little drums on the hubs still for the emergency brake, plus the discs surrounding them for the disc braking. Discs don't work well for emergency brakes.

I'm not sure if that's a factor here, but it might be.
 
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