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What is everyone's opinion on optimal PSI for smoothest ride to absorb bumps and uneven pavement?
 

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Everyone's "optimum" PSI is different and depends of several factors. You'll get better answers if you indicate your tire size and the tire manufacturers maximum PSI. Not all Accords come with the same tire sizes and specs. Some are 17" with 44 PSI max and some are 19" with 50 PSI max. Some may have already changed their factory installed tires.

Also, Honda's recommended PSI is always way too low IMO. Others may feel differently.

Read the below thread for another discussion about tire pressure.

https://www.accordxclub.com/forum/9-2018-honda-accord-general-discussion-forum/1250-tire-pressure-2018-touring.html
 

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Everyone's "optimum" PSI is different and depends on several factors. You'll get better answers if you indicate your tire size and the tire manufacturers maximum PSI. Not all Accords come with the same tire sizes and specs. Some are 17" with 44 PSI max and some are 19" with 50 PSI max. Some may have already changed their factory installed tires.

Also, Honda's recommended PSI is always way too low IMO. Others may feel differently.

Read the below thread for another discussion about tire pressure.

https://www.accordxclub.com/forum/9-2018-honda-accord-general-discussion-forum/1250-tire-pressure-2018-touring.html

@Keyboard I didn't know you used drugs so heavily. :devil: The max pressure is what the tire manufacturer puts on the tire as tested, not as tested on a certain vehicle, but as testing at the most P.S.I. the tire will hold. This pressure does not mean it should be used on all vehicles they are put on. Based on the weight of the Accord both the tire builder ie; Michelin, and Honda have determined that the tire needs to be inflated to the tire pressure indicated in the door jamb of the car. There is no benefit to an overinflated tire. :grin:

PLEASE DO NOT OVERINFLATE TIRES!
 

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@Keyboard I didn't know you used drugs so heavily. :devil: The max pressure is what the tire manufacturer puts on the tire as tested, not as tested on a certain vehicle, but as testing at the most P.S.I. the tire will hold. This pressure does not mean it should be used on all vehicles they are put on. Based on the weight of the Accord both the tire builder ie; Michelin, and Honda have determined that the tire needs to be inflated to the tire pressure indicated in the door jamb of the car. There is no benefit to an overinflated tire. :grin:

PLEASE DO NOT OVERINFLATE TIRES!
They are NOT over inflated! I've been doing this for over 40 years with excellent results in the ride, safety, wear, and longevity. The 90% rule just works!

The tire pressure listed in the door jam is a recommendation, not an absolute. It is a compromise to account for maximum load, maximum speed and other extreme conditions. And, if you change your tire size to something other than what came with the car, then that information is totally useless and wrong ... Think about it!

BTW, the maximum PSI listed on the tire is NOT the maximum that the tire can hold. It is however, the maximum that the tire manufacturer considers safe, especially under extreme conditions. The 90% rule keeps me in that margin of safety.

The bottom line is I'll stick with my 40 years of experience, but thanks for your concern.
 

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They are NOT overinflated! I've been doing this for over 40 years with excellent results in the ride, safety, wear, and longevity. The 90% rule just works!

The tire pressure listed in the door jam is a recommendation, not an absolute. It is a compromise to account for maximum load, maximum speed, and other extreme conditions. And, if you change your tire size to something other than what came with the car, then that information is totally useless and wrong ... Think about it! We are not talking about different sizes, but if you do it's up to you to figure this out.

BTW, the maximum PSI listed on the tire is NOT the maximum that the tire can hold. It is, however, the maximum that the tire manufacturer considers safe, especially under extreme conditions. The 90% rule keeps me in that margin of safety. True, but if you don't want it blowing up down the road you should not inflate past that.

The bottom line is I'll stick with my 40 years of experience, but thanks for your concern.

So you're saying that the performance level of cars and tires have not changed in 40 years? You are misinformed.
:surprise:Wow
 

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It is amazing how often discussions about oil changes and tire pressure turn into internet fights. I guess some would really flip if I said I keep my motorcycle tires at 100% max PSI. :surprise:

There are a lot of myths and misinformation about tire pressure, especially on the internet. But, for those interested, below is an article which I feel gives a good explanation of how to choose your ideal tire pressure. Generally, you should choose the PSI that satisfies your specific needs. In other words, once size (PSI) doesn't fit all needs.

However, there is a minimum recommended PSI which is on a label located on the driver's door jam of your Accord. Notice I said the door label specifies the minimum recommended PSI, which means you can use more PSI to suit your needs.


Note also when you read the article that it discusses the 90% rule I use, but frames it as 10% below the tire's maximum PSI (same result). It doesn't say the 90% rule is ideal, but rather it can be used as a starting point to work backward toward the car's minimum recommended PSI if desired (or start at the minimum and work your way up to the 90% maximum).

Anyway, enjoy the article, and good luck finding that ideal PSI :smile:
AGCO Automotive Repair Service - Baton Rouge, LA - Detailed Auto Topics - What is the Best Tire Pressure
 

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It is amazing how often discussions about oil changes and tire pressure turn into internet fights. I guess some would really flip if I said I keep my motorcycle tires at 100% max PSI. :surprise:

There are a lot of myths and misinformation about tire pressure, especially on the internet. But, for those interested, below is an article which I feel gives a good explanation of how to choose your ideal tire pressure. Generally, you should choose the PSI that satisfies your specific needs. In other words, once size (PSI) doesn't fit all needs.

However, there is a minimum recommended PSI which is on a label located on the driver's door jam of your Accord. Notice I said the door label specifies the minimum recommended PSI, which means you can use more PSI to suit your needs.


Note also when you read the article that it discusses the 90% rule I use, but frames it as 10% below the tire's maximum PSI (same result). It doesn't say the 90% rule is ideal, but rather it can be used as a starting point to work backward toward the car's minimum recommended PSI if desired (or start at the minimum and work your way up to the 90% maximum).

Anyway, enjoy the article, and good luck finding that ideal PSI :smile:
AGCO Automotive Repair Service - Baton Rouge, LA - Detailed Auto Topics - What is the Best Tire Pressure
Not trying to fight I just want to educate the uninformed. I don't think I would take the advice of a tractor tire company on any performance tires. Just saying:smile:
 

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It is amazing how often discussions about oil changes and tire pressure turn into internet fights. I guess some would really flip if I said I keep my motorcycle tires at 100% max PSI.


There are a lot of myths and misinformation about tire pressure, especially on the internet. But, for those interested, below is an article which I feel gives a good explanation of how to choose your ideal tire pressure. Generally, you should choose the PSI that satisfies your specific needs. In other words, once size (PSI) doesn't fit all needs.

However, there is a minimum recommended PSI which is on a label located on the driver's door jam of your Accord. Notice I said the door label specifies the minimum recommended PSI, which means you can use more PSI to suit your needs.


Note also when you read the article that it discusses the 90% rule I use, but frames it as 10% below the tire's maximum PSI (same result). It doesn't say the 90% rule is ideal, but rather it can be used as a starting point to work backward toward the car's minimum recommended PSI if desired (or start at the minimum and work your way up to the 90% maximum).

Anyway, enjoy the article, and good luck finding that ideal PSI

AGCO Automotive Repair Service - Baton Rouge, LA - Detailed Auto Topics - What is the Best Tire Pressure

Great article. Thank you.
 

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Good Stuff - I always try to Learn something New ~

PSI. :surprise:

There are a lot of myths and misinformation about tire pressure, especially on the internet. But, for those interested, below is an article which I feel gives a good explanation of how to choose your ideal tire pressure. Generally, you should choose the PSI that satisfies your specific needs. In other words, once size (PSI) doesn't fit all needs.

However, there is a minimum recommended PSI which is on a label located on the driver's door jam of your Accord. Notice I said the door label specifies the minimum recommended PSI, which means you can use more PSI to suit your needs.


Note also when you read the article that it discusses the 90% rule I use, but frames it as 10% below the tire's maximum PSI (same result). It doesn't say the 90% rule is ideal, but rather it can be used as a starting point to work backward toward the car's minimum recommended PSI if desired (or start at the minimum and work your way up to the 90% maximum).

Anyway, enjoy the article, and good luck finding that ideal PSI :smile:
AGCO Automotive Repair Service - Baton Rouge, LA - Detailed Auto Topics - What is the Best Tire Pressure[/QUOTE]

Most Persons don't Realize that over 60% of Modern Improvements in Society are all based off Idea's from ~ Time Line from 5000 Yrs. ago to 50 yrs. ago and the other 40% are from ~ Computers Age & NASA
Use of Fission Materials . .

Anyway always Great to get Fresh Input or to Gain New Insight . .
Seems I ran across this Rule when I was Young , as many of My Friends were Farmers or Grew Up on Farm . .
I Generally Run 3-4 Lbs over the Suggested . . Currently running 34 Front & 32 Rear - Tire wear seems good so Far 4500 miles . . MPG is Way Better Then @ 31 Psi or 32 Psi ..Frt. :)
 

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EngTech,

Where in the world did you ever get this information to over-inflate beyond the manufacturers recommendations? TERRIBLE ADVICE.

Use the recommendation on the sticker inside the driver side door well. A few pounds less will not hurt and give a smoother ride.

Please read the following and try to remember most Accord owners did not buy them to run in track events, road races, etc.

An overinflated tire is stiff and unyielding and the size of its footprint in contact with the road is reduced. If a vehicle's tires are overinflated by 6 psi, they could be damaged more easily when running over potholes or debris in the road. Higher inflated tires cannot isolate road irregularities well, causing them to ride harsher. However, higher inflation pressures usually provide an improvement in steering response and cornering stability up to a point. This is why participants who use street tires in autocrosses, track events and road races run higher than normal inflation pressures. The pressure must be checked with a quality air gauge as the inflation pressure cannot be accurately estimated through visual inspection.
 

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You have been mistaken now EngTech for 40 years. USE THE DRIVER DOOR JAMB NUMBERS and please quit misinforming all these people.
If Honda Engineering liked your 90% advice it would be on the tag inside the driver doorjamb.
 

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34 psi on my 2019 2.0T touring.
The weather got colder overnight and i got the "tire pressure" warning on my dash. I stopped, checked the tires, then recalibrated it (since i knew it was at 33psi all around), and the warning came on again. Soooo, i ended up adding a few PSI in (to 36 PSI). Now, no warning. Strange that at 33, i would get that warning.
 

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The weather got colder overnight and i got the "tire pressure" warning on my dash. I stopped, checked the tires, then recalibrated it (since i knew it was at 33psi all around), and the warning came on again. Soooo, i ended up adding a few PSI in (to 36 PSI). Now, no warning. Strange that at 33, i would get that warning.
It takes several miles for the actual recalibration to happen. It's in the manual somewhere. BTW, if the temperature dropped significantly, your tire pressures would have dropped from the 33 psi (according to Charles Law). If you added to air to make it 36 after driving around, that's probably around 33 dead cold.
 

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The weather got colder overnight and i got the "tire pressure" warning on my dash. I stopped, checked the tires, then recalibrated it (since i knew it was at 33psi all around), and the warning came on again. Soooo, i ended up adding a few PSI in (to 36 PSI). Now, no warning. Strange that at 33, i would get that warning.
It takes several miles for the actual recalibration to happen. It's in the manual somewhere. BTW, if the temperature dropped significantly, your tire pressures would have dropped from the 33 psi (according to Charles Law). If you added to air to make it 36 after driving around, that's probably around 33 dead cold.
It was over 50 degrees in my garage when i originally dry them to 33-34 psi. The next morning i drove out into 29 degree temperature outside. I'd have to look st my old college books for the formula to figure out how much of a drop in psi that would cause.
 

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The weather got colder overnight and i got the "tire pressure" warning on my dash. I stopped, checked the tires, then recalibrated it (since i knew it was at 33psi all around), and the warning came on again. Soooo, i ended up adding a few PSI in (to 36 PSI). Now, no warning. Strange that at 33, i would get that warning.
It takes several miles for the actual recalibration to happen. It's in the manual somewhere. BTW, if the temperature dropped significantly, your tire pressures would have dropped from the 33 psi (according to Charles Law). If you added to air to make it 36 after driving around, that's probably around 33 dead cold.
It was over 50 degrees in my garage when i originally dry them to 33-34 psi. The next morning i drove out into 29 degree temperature outside. I'd have to look st my old college books for the formula to figure out how much of a drop in psi that would cause.
I looked it up. 1 psi decrease for every 10 degrees reduction in temp. So that would explain it. Thanks for your help.
 

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EngTech,

Where in the world did you ever get this information to over-inflate beyond the manufacturers recommendations? TERRIBLE ADVICE.

Use the recommendation on the sticker inside the driver side door well. A few pounds less will not hurt and give a smoother ride.

Please read the following and try to remember most Accord owners did not buy them to run in track events, road races, etc.

An overinflated tire is stiff and unyielding and the size of its footprint in contact with the road is reduced. If a vehicle's tires are overinflated by 6 psi, they could be damaged more easily when running over potholes or debris in the road. Higher inflated tires cannot isolate road irregularities well, causing them to ride harsher. However, higher inflation pressures usually provide an improvement in steering response and cornering stability up to a point. This is why participants who use street tires in autocrosses, track events and road races run higher than normal inflation pressures. The pressure must be checked with a quality air gauge as the inflation pressure cannot be accurately estimated through visual inspection.
You have been mistaken now EngTech for 40 years. USE THE DRIVER DOOR JAMB NUMBERS and please quit misinforming all these people.
If Honda Engineering liked your 90% advice it would be on the tag inside the driver doorjamb.
I am the one who originally mentioned the 90% rule, not EngTech. He just screwed up his reply when he quoted me. Maybe you never heard about the 90% rule, but that doesn't make it misinformation. Did you read the link I posted earlier?

The numbers on the driver's doorjamb is a recommendation, not an absolute. Honda even says it's a recommendation and ... get this ... Honda recommends increasing the doorjamb PSI under certain driving conditions. The engineers chose a number mostly to meet minimum performance coupled with a soft ride. It's also a compromise number since not all vehicles will carry the same weight and number of passages and cargo. Additionally, higher inflation does not equal over inflation. And you'll never convince me that a 50 PSI max tire inflated to 33 PSI is best. That's only a 66% inflation rate which generates more heat and faster tire wear.

In any event, I'll continue using the 90% rule and you continue with the doorjamb numbers.
 

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What is everyone's opinion on optimal PSI for smoothest ride to absorb bumps and uneven pavement?
Generally "P" passenger and "LT" light truck tires are run at nothing lower than MFG recommended PSI.

However both can safely be run at max cold PSI, if you like riding on rocks and don't mind a slight loss of dry traction. But in some cases, such as towing, added PSI provides stability. For others, less rolling resistance for best MPG.


And I mentioned towing; Almost all "ST" standard trailer tires are run at no less than max cold PSI per OEM's and best practice for towing heavy.


There are also "load inflation" standards (mostly used for LT tires) that if you know your axle weights, can custom tune tire PSI to match. Or at least verify you're not under inflated, which is a significant cause of failure.
 
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