2018 Honda Accord Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Peeps.
2019 Honda Accord Hybrid Touring here.
Just over 1,000 miles now.
Quick question.
So, recommended tire pressure is 33PSI with Maxx Pressure of 44PSI.
I keep about 35 PSI in my tires regularly and check them once a month.
I plan on doing a road trip with 4 people and trunk full of luggage, camping chairs and loaded cooler.
A heavy load.
What tire pressure should I put in the tires for a mainly highway trip?
Thanks in advance for all your opinions.
Bri.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
199 Posts
I have a 2018 Hybrid and set mine to 36 all around. I wouldn't ever have that sort of load but I wouldn't adjust the tires any if I did. Safe travels.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
Hey Peeps.
2019 Honda Accord Hybrid Touring here.
Just over 1,000 miles now.
Quick question.
So, recommended tire pressure is 33PSI with Maxx Pressure of 44PSI.
I keep about 35 PSI in my tires regularly and check them once a month.
I plan on doing a road trip with 4 people and trunk full of luggage, camping chairs and loaded cooler.
A heavy load.
What tire pressure should I put in the tires for a mainly highway trip?
Thanks in advance for all your opinions.
Bri.
Like you I have my tires inflated to 35 PSI (this is what my tech @ dealership set/recommended them), and check them monthly. As long as you don't exceed the max weight ratings (see pages 696/698 of owner's manual) I would think no adjustments would be needed (as it is we are already couple pounds over recommended PSI).

Now if your concern is you might exceed those weight limits I would think inflating the tires more would result in a harsher ride. If the weight limit is exceeded the suspension is already stressed maybe resulting in a harsher ride... adding more air to tires would add to the hardness of the ride IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Well Scotty Kilmer recommends that you do the tire pressure based on its cold temperature. Of course he lives in Texas these days....cold temperature can be pretty cold in upstate NY.

Anyhow like you I just tend to make sure they are running a pound or two above recommended.

However, I remember one year I was driving through Pennsylvania on a very hot day at high speeds and I decided on a whim to check my tire pressure. My tires were at something like 48 psi. The sticker on the door said to use 30 psi and the top rated pressure for the tire (printed on the tire) was something like 42 PSI. In that situation I let some air out of the tires. I think there is a potential for high speed blow out under those conditions. (And there was some kind of deal where Firestone tires blew out about 15 years ago in hot high speed driving on heavy SUVs, made national news)

So I think that it is wise to keep track of what you're doing. Summer is here and if you're on a long trip at high speed on a hot road, I would think it a good idea to let the air out till it is no more than the pressure printed on the wall of the tire. It might even make sense to run it lower than that. But of course you pull off the road have lunch or arrive at your destination the tires are going to cool down. You want to find an average that works and monitor the extreme situations. And if you're in a winter area you might want to monitor the tendency to under-inflation in cold weather. Round here we get stretches of 0 to 10 degree weather, doesn't seem to make much difference, but there are parts of the country where you get to thirty below zero and I'm sure you'd want to inflate to the PSI rating on your door sticker under cold conditions, maybe not extremely cold, but don't set PSI in October when it's 40 degrees out and expect it to work in January when it's -40 degrees out.

Greg N
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
When it says "cold pressure" it does not mean cold temperature…. it only means to check/adjust tire pressure before driving the car. As the tires get warm the air in them will too... hot air expands creating increased pressure. Tire manufacturers realize this and that's why they say check the tires cold... they take into consideration that hot air will expand and their suggested (cold) pressure will compensate for that expansion. It's not necessary to deflate air from hot tires if you do you risk running the tire under the recommended pressure.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top