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I had my oil changed and tires rotated today at the Honda dealer. The service tech stated that the tires were at about the half way point to needing to be replaced. The car currently has the Michelin Primacy tires. According to Michelins website the have a 50,000 mile warranty. The car currently has 18,200 on it and that's a far cry from the "half way" point. He said that the was about 5/32's on 2, 6/32's on 1 and 4/32's on the last one. I do not drive the car hard. I mainly drive about 40 miles a day to and from work. I do not hate the tires but I'm not to impressed with the life span. I measured the tread depth also to make sure they were being honest.

That being said, I am looking for a few recommendations on a new tire to replace them with when the time comes. I am not looking to spend $250 a tire for the Michelins to just replace them in less that 40k. I have been looking mainly at the CONTINENTAL
PURECONTACT LS 235/40/19. They have a 70k mile warranty compared to the Michelins 50k. The Continentals have very good ratings. Or should I possibly contact Michelin to see if they would honor the treadwear warranty?

Anyway, I appreciate any suggestions you guys have and I am open to any recommendations. Sorry for being long winded.
 

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I have no suggestions as to a better tire, however I would definitely contact Michelin (see attachment for contact info) regarding warranty. If they are half worn at 18.2K then full wear would be 36.4K far less than what they are stating as tire life.

One thing I do because of these being low profile tires on our cars is check tire pressure every month. I also run 34 PSI in them (Honda recommends 33 PSI) along w/rotating tires every oil change (approximately every 3.5k miles or less).

Regarding the Continental's you mentioned they got positive reviews in this thread - Replacing stock Goodyear Touring tires.

Whatever tires you choose if you aren't already they need to be checked monthly for pressure and rotated often to get maximum life out of them... Good luck on a possible warranty compensation from Michelin or finding a replacement that will give you a longer tire life.
 

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My 2018 2.0T Touring came with Michelin Primacy MXM4 235/40/R19 and it now has about 39600 miles and they are about to be replaced in a month or two. They performed well for 19" low profile. I will either get same Michelin or try Continental just to try if Conti perform better.
 

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I contacted Michelin and explained to them what the dealer stated. Michelin opened a case for me and told me to call them back when the tires had 3/32 of wear left on them. At that point they will prorate the tires towards the purchase of new ones. We will see what the rate will be when I go to purchase new ones.
 

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I ordered Continental True Contacts as soon as I got home from the dealer and sold the OEM tires for $200 on Craigs.

I don't bother with warranties most of the time I get into a fight with the vendor over warranty issues and you can't win at least 3/4 of the time they say that particular thing isn't covered.

It may be that I'm just too nervous about the whole tire thing but frankly I get about 60 or 70% of the rated wear/warranty on tires. I don't race around I don't have hard stops. But H rated tires corner best and if you want the stopping power in an emergency then H-rated is the way you want to go. If you want a tire to LAST then get a G, J, or K rated tire they very likely will last up until their warranty rating.

Here's my advice:

1. Get to know Tirerack.com real well. They have the data on wet and dry stopping and cornering and a bunch of other stuff.
2. If you want to push to the limit on your tire treads, be my guest. I am fortunate in having the money to buy tires when I need them and when I start getting worried and checking them a lot I just figure whatthehell and get a new set. That's probably why I only get 60 or 70% of the rated usage.
3. Football can be a game of yards and inches and so are tires.

Two stories.

1. I was solo driving in VT one fine summer and really annoyed at a long slow convoy of cars on a two lane road and decided to make an aggressive passing play to get around this open bed semi that was loaded full of pipes that stuck out the rear. Things were going really well till I realized that this big truck was coming to a stop and I needed it to go forward so I would have a space to pull into. There were cars oncoming, I was in left lane. I was slowing down from 60 into an almost-stopped truck with pipes sticking out. The thing is, the guy's brake and turn lights were baked in mud. That's why I couldn't see them. I leaned hard on the brakes and watched in horror as the rear of this truck came up. My car stopped with a piece of four inch steel pipe about 18 inches in front of driver's side windshield. That was a case of inches. And that was definitely a case where, if I had not had H-rated tires, I probably would have gone into the pipe.

2, Back in the day I had a 240SX and was out at night iwth my wife in our RWD 240SX (Nissan). This is upstate NY. I wasn't going more than 30 on a turn I usually took at 55. Fortunately the highway was deserted. I lost control of the car and we did a full 360 degree turn and I turned to my wife and said, "You know, $400 for snow tires is looking pretty cheap." I was using all weather.

It's all about cost, safety, performance: all the tires out there are legal, choose the ones that make you feel all-around OK. I tend to emphasize stopping distance (taking the best compromise of wet and dry, it's surprising how much variation there is) and minimal road noise when I buy the all-seasons (which I use for 3 seasons). You tend to get a quiet ride and good stopping with the H-rated tires that wear out faster. But that rule does not hold across all brands, which is why you need to spend time on Tirerack.com. It's hard to make the best pick but you get helpful hints by looking at what everyone else is buying.

I'm not as aggressive about passing these days, lesson learned! and I always use snow tires in winter. Tires are expensive! Here I had this brand new 2019 Accord last May and I bought $600 in new tires right off the bat (netting out at $400 after selling OEM) and then in September I had to buy a second set of rims and snow tires, that was a cool $1.3k. IME tires last best if they go on their rims and stay there, I no longer alternate two sets of tires on one set of rims for winter. I save a bit by swapping them myself.

Greg
 
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